Emergency Management

Emergency KitHow to React in an Emergency Situation

You may have some of these basic emergency kit items already, such as a flashlight, battery-operated radio, food, water and blankets. The key is to make sure they are organized, easy to find and easy to carry (in a suitcase with wheels or in a backpack) in case you need to evacuate your home. Whatever you do, don't wait for a disaster to happen.

To learn more about how to prepare your emergency kit, visit Canada's Get Prepared site.

Alberta Emergency Alert Website

Special Areas 2

Director of Emergency Management: Owen Francis (403) 854-0489 or (403) 854-5603
Deputy Director of Emergency Management: Brett Richards (403) 854-5600
Fire Chief/Deputy Director of Emergency Management: Glen Durand (403) 854-0625 or (403) 779-3733
Hanna Fire Department Fire and Rescue: 911
Hanna Ambulance: 911
Hanna RCMP: 911
Administration: (403) 854-3393
24 Hr. Dispatch: (403) 854-3391

Special Areas 3

Director of Emergency Management: Owen Francis (403) 854-0489 or (403) 854-5600
Deputy Director of Emergency Management: Darran Dick (403) 664-0729 or (403) 664-3618
Fire Chief/Deputy Director of Emergency Management: Glen Durand (403) 854-0625 or (403) 779-3733
Youngstown / Special Areas Fire Department - Fire Only: 911
Regional EMS: 911
Oyen RCMP: 911
24 Hour Dispatch : (403) 664-3883
Administration: (403) 664-3505

Special Areas 4

Director of Emergency Management: Owen Francis (403) 854-0489 or (403) 854-5600
Deputy Director of Emergency Management: Corinne Kelts (403) 575-0893 or (403) 577-3523
Fire Chief/Deputy Director of Emergency Management: Glen Durand (403) 854-0625 or (403) 779-3733
Consort Fire Department - Fire and Rescue: 911
Consort RCMP: 911
24 Hr Dispatch: (403) 577-3000
Administration: (403) 577-3001

Emergencies and disasters can occur anytime, anywhere. Some are seasonal, allowing you to prepare in advance. Others occur swiftly and without warning. Planning ahead and preparing for your family's needs can make a big difference in your ability to cope. You can lessen the impact of an emergency or disaster by knowing what to do before, during and after one occurs.

To learn more about what you can do to prepare for emergencies, go to Canada's Get Prepared site.

Who does what in an emergency?

Who does what in an emergency?

When it comes to emergency preparedness and emergency management, we all have a role to play.

Individuals and families

Individuals take steps ahead of time to prepare themselves and their families for emergencies. You should be prepared to take care of yourself and your family for a minimum of 72 hours during an emergency. You should also understand the basic principles of first aid and safety.

Every disaster is a local disaster. Different levels of organizations respond progressively as an emergency escalates and their resources are needed. The first ones to respond are closest to the emergency.

First Responders – i.e. fire, police, paramedics

Local fire, police, paramedic, and search and rescue teams are normally the first to respond to an emergency. They are responsible for managing most local emergencies as part of the municipal emergency plan. Find out more about the emergency plan in your area by contacting your emergency management organization (EMO).

Non-government organizations

There are several non-profit, non-government organizations (NGOs) that play very important roles in emergency management, including disaster prevention/mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery. Some examples include the Canadian Red Cross, St. John Ambulance and The Salvation Army. They work in partnership with governments to help Canadians deal with emergencies, from providing first aid training to disaster relief.

Provincial and territorial governments

Every province and territory has an emergency management organization (EMO), which manages large-scale emergencies and provides assistance to municipal or community response teams as required. EMOs fulfill an important role in support of first responders and municipalities. Federal departments and agencies support provincial or territorial EMOs as requested. They also manage emergencies that involve areas of federal jurisdiction, such as nuclear safety, national defense and border security.